Non Criminal Fingerprinting

When beginning the process of obtaining a Canadian Pardon the first step is to have a set of fingerprints taken. Keep in mind that this is non criminal fingerprinting. It is not the same process as when you were arrested.

This can be done by most police detachments as well as private fingerprinting organizations.  If you start a Canadian Pardon application with the National Pardon Centre and live in the Toronto or Montreal area you can come into our office to have your fingerprints taken at no additional cost.  The National Pardon Centre is RCMP accredited, offering both ink and electronic fingerprinting services.

Electronic Fingerprinting Services

Obviously not everyone lives close to one of our offices.  In this case you will need to use one of the other means to have your fingerprints taken and for many people this means going to your local police detachment.  This can be a daunting task for many people. Those who live in small towns tend to be especially reluctant since we all know how quickly gossip spread in a small town. The thought alone of announcing to everyone that you had a past criminal record is enough to stop many people in their tracks when contemplating beginning the Canadian Pardon process.

Don’t let this fear deter you as you do have options.  Drive to another town to have your fingerprints done or seek out a private fingerprinting organization.

Another option is to have your fingerprints done by your local police station for the purpose of something other than a pardon. You can simply tell the fingerprinting technician that the prints are for employment or volunteering.  If you are a client of the National Pardon Centre you can send the ink fingerprints to us and we can scan them into our AFIS (automated fingerprinting identification system) and digitally submit them to the RCMP on your behalf. We will certify them for a pardon or waiver and it doesn’t matter what the person taking your fingerprints was told.

Keep in mind that if you are concerned about having your fingerprints taken you are not alone. But overcoming this small obstacle will provide considerable peace of mind. The knowledge that you are taking the steps to move on from your past will open your future to new possibilities. After all, why live with a criminal record when you don’t have to.

If you have any questions about non-criminal fingerprinting and how the National Pardon Centre can help you get yours done just give us a call.

About Michael Ashby

Michael Ashby is Co-Founder and Communications Director for the National Pardon Centre. Get in touch with Michael by sending an email to mashby@nationalpardon.org or calling extension 227.Michael Ashby est le co-fondateur et le directeur des communications au Centre du Pardon national. Contactez Michael par email au mashby@nationalpardon.org ou par téléphone au poste 227.

2 Comments

  • Lisa Ann says:

    Just a comment about the fingerprinting issue. Here in BC our local police have two separate forms they use for fingerprinting. One expressly states that it is for the purpose of a pardon application/record suspension and the other is a general one for work, volunteering etc that does not refer to a pardon. The Parole Board instructions state that we must ensure that it is clearly identified on the form that the fingerprints are being taken for the purpose of a pardon. I once submitted fingerprints to Ottawa on a general form but in the letter it was set out that it was for a pardon application and the forms were returned to me. Deliberately lying to a police officer or directing a client to do so does not speak well towards a person’s character or ethics and is just simply wrong.

  • Hi Lisa-Ann,

    I don’t see the situation the way you do. However, thank you for your comments. Please keep in mind that you are incorrect when you state that the police have two separate forms for different types of fingerprinting. The police take fingerprints on RCMP C216-C forms and the only difference is a check box near the bottom that can be selected for a range of purposes. Since it is of no business to the police officer taking the fingerprints if the person is applying for a pardon, waiver or anything else there is no reason to state the exact reason for taking the fingerprints. We are all entitled to a certain amount of privacy even when speaking to a fingerprinting technician who works in a police station. Having fingerprints taken is not something done under oath.

    Michael

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