Why is it taking so long?

By April 12, 2012 Pardon 6 Comments

Not only has the waiting period for eligibility been increased now that Stephen Harper has had his way with Canada’s pardon program but once you are eligible the backlog at the Parole Board of Canada means you will have to wait even longer. Is this fair? No. Did it have to be this way? No. Why did this happen? Politics.

At least that’s my take on it. The number of photo opps Stephen Harper managed to get in with Sheldon Kennedy standing beside him is shameful politicking in my opinion. If the Conservative government actually cared about victims and preventing crimes in the first place they would not have been looking at Canada’s pardon program. They would have been looking at the absence of a law requiring groups working with youth and other vulnerable groups to perform vulnerable sector background checks as a part of standard hiring procedures. But they didn’t do that. Why? Who knows. But any government that claims to stand up for victims and safety that allows that to go unnoticed is both insincere and incompetent.

But at least people who are just trying to change their lives and get back to work will have to wait a lot longer to do so.

Just how that will make anyone safer is something I am still struggling to understand.

About Michael Ashby

Michael Ashby is Co-Founder and Communications Director for the National Pardon Centre. Get in touch with Michael by sending an email to mashby@nationalpardon.org or calling extension 227.Michael Ashby est le co-fondateur et le directeur des communications au Centre du Pardon national. Contactez Michael par email au mashby@nationalpardon.org ou par téléphone au poste 227.

6 Comments

  • Anon says:

    Hi Michael,

    How much does a record suspension cost?

    I committed a serious crime in 1982, was arrested in 1984 and convicted in June, 1986. I was released on parole sometime in 1990. I have no convictions since that date. Do I still need a record suspension, or is my record automatically suspended after 20 years?

    Also, how much would it cost to get a waiver to the US? Given that I was convicted for a political offence, is there any point trying to get a waiver?

    Thanks for reading this post.

  • Birgit Davidson says:

    Hi Anon,

    Our fees for a standard record suspension are $595. Average timeframe is around 18 months. We can put a rush on your file within our office for $695. This normally allows the pardon to be completed within 1 year. Obviously, every case is different so it is not possible for us to guarantee timeframes. If you were convicted of a serious offence, then it could take longer for the Parole Board to assess your case. You must also pay the Parole Board processing fee which is currently $631.

    There is a common misconception that records automatically purge after a certain number of years. This is completely false. You must apply for a record suspension to clear your record. From what you have told me, you are now eligible to do so. Please feel free to contact me if you would like to begin a file.

    What was the charge that you were convicted of? The US Admissibility Review Office looks at a number of factors in evaluating the merits of your application. The fact that you have had no further convictions in 26 years certainly improves your chances of receiving a waiver. I have seen people with very serious records receive waivers so I certainly think the possibility is there. Please feel free to contact me for additional info.

    Birgit

    866-242-2411 x 106

  • Jason Rocklin says:

    Please do something about preventing violence against women, child abuse, wife assault, elder abuse, guns, gangs and drugs, child abduction and kidnappings, armed home invasions and armed bank robberies over Canada and if the policemen catches any suspects suspicious of these following crimes; the policemen will arrest the suspects, lock them up and throw away the key. that way Canada will be safe like it used to be in the ’60,s like Toronto the Good.

  • Michael says:

    I’ll get right on that.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi Michael.

    Just checking in to see if you’ve achieved all of Jason’s requests?

    It’s been almost two weeks. I figure that was enough time.

    Oh, and while you’re making society better like the “good ‘ol days” of the 1960s, can you please see what you can do about the domestic violence rates? They’re far, far too low.

    And while you’re at it, how about something about visible minorities? They seem to be very…*employed* these days and I find that problematic. Some of them even vote, I’m told.

    Plus, while we’re on the subject, I’m VERY disturbed by the general trend towards fewer and fewer wrongful arrests and convictions. I mean, they still happen — and let’s be thankful for small favours — but, back when Toronto the Good was worthy of that name, you could spend a week or a month or maybe even years in jail just for, you know, being a musician or something depraved like that. I mean really. A musician! And not even a marching band musician. Jazz! You know what they play in the elevators in hell? That’s right: jazz.

    Furthermore, while you’re finally doing something worthy with your time (helping people get pardons or record suspensions seems pretty petty when there are other important things to do), I’d like to see what you can do about bringing back some good old fashioned riots. And I don’t mean your vanilla pudding G20 stuff. I mean good, old fashioned beatings — like the kinds we had in the 60s. I’ll leave it up to you (for now) what kind of riots are the most suitable. War-related is fine, but something to do with worker rights is better.

    And of course, it goes without saying that workers have far, far too many rights. Do you know that if a worker is mamed or even killed on the job, that the work actually stops in some places? For sometimes as long as a day! How are we going to keep the commies off of Parliament Hill with that attitude? Do you know what they call worker injuries in Russia? Well, neither do I. But they have lots of tanks and that’s pretty much all I think needs to be said.

    Lastly, I’d like to see what you can about the law of gravity and the fact that the sky is ALWAYS blue. I don’t think this is appropriate. I’m not thinking about myself. I’m thinking about the children.

    I’ll circle back with you in a week, and I’d appreciate a comprehensive project report at that time.

  • Working on the sky is blue problem and it isn’t going so well. As for gravity I rather enjoy it, so we will have to find some sort of compromise. lol.
    Best regards,
    Michael

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